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November 2, 2008

Campaign ’08 Final Weekend 3: Saturday’s Best Contrast of How Obama – McCain Shaped Up

SELMA, AL - NOVEMBER 01:  College students on the NAACP's "Vote Hard" bus tour walk across the historic Edmund Pettis Bridge November 1, 2008 in Selma, Alabama. The bridge was where civil rights marchers on the first Selma to Montgomery march were forcibly turned back by police using clubs and tear gas in 1965. The marches eventually led to the Voting Rights Act of 1965 ending voter disfranchisement against African-Americans. Americans are gearing up for the first presidential election featuring an African-American to be officially nominated as a candidate for U.S. president by a major party, Democratic contender Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL), who is running against Republican Sen. John McCain (R-AZ).  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)Former US Republican senator from Virginia George Allen speaks ahead of Republican presidential candidate John McCain during a rally on November 1, 2008 in Springfield, Virginia. Mc Cain and Democrat rival Barack Obama enter the final weekend of their epic race for the White House, scrambling across several states in a last dash for votes. On right is Allen's wife Susan.        AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Up top: In a moving “get out the vote” statement to help elect America’s first African-American president, Getty photographer Mario Tama captures college students retracing the “Bloody Sunday” march across the Edmund Pettis Bridge in Selma, Alabama. The beatings administered by police over forty years ago, in part, led to passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Down below: Former senator George “Macaca” Allen — a present day symbol of racial small-mindedness — pitching for McCain in Virginia. …The hand gesture is perfect.

(image 1: Mario Tama/Getty. November 1, 2008 in Selma, Alabama. image 2: Mandel Ngan/Getty. November 1, 2008 in Springfield, Virginia)

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