Reading The Pictures is dedicated to the analysis of news photos and media images.
November 20, 2015

Tell Us What You Really Think About Carson

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You can imply a lot of different things in a photo gallery. The content and sequence of the pictures will suggest all kinds of meanings. In this case, for example, I’m wondering if the inclusion of two specific photos might have delivered Ben Carson a subtle slap.

If you clicked through the 39 pictures in Yahoo’s “Photos of the Day” slideshow yesterday, a random grouping largely dealing with crises abroad, you would have come upon the photo above at #14.  The photo shows Carson filling out paperwork in New Hampshire to officially place his name on the state’s presidential primary ballot.

If you keep clicking through, past the Palestinian protesters, past the transgender vigil in India, past the Italian soldier guarding the Colosseum in the aftermath of the terror attack in Paris, you would stumble upon this oddity at #28:

NH Primary filing

In the only other campaign photo in the slideshow, what we see is a guy named Vermin Supreme, a rubber boot atop his head, filing out paperwork in the self-same spot Carson was standing to place his name on the presidential ballot, as well.

Of course, you can’t look at Vermin’s picture without the Carson photo revivifying instantly in your mind. And, to the extent people see Carson punching above his weight class, what are viewers likely to make of this?

Well, I’m not sure about you but what immediately crossed my mind was: I guess they’ll let just about anybody run for president these days.

(photo 1: Darren McCollester/Getty Images caption: Republican Presidential candidate Dr. Ben Carson files paperwork at the State House with Secretary of State Bill Gardner November 20, 2015 in Concord, New Hampshire. Carson has consistently placed near the top in polls in the crowded field for the Republican nomination. photo 2: Brian Snyder/Reuters. caption: U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Vermin Supreme (L) reacts after filing his declaration of candidacy to appear on the New Hampshire primary election ballot in Concord, New Hampshire, November 20, 2015. To appear on the primary ballot candidates must sign a declaration affirming that they meet the Constitutional requirements to run for President and pay a $1,000 filing fee.)

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